Happy Witches Day!



Friday the 13th superstitions originated in a Norse myth about twelve gods having a feast in Valhalla. The mischievous Loki crashed the party as an uninvited 13th guest and arranged for Hod, the blind god of darkness, to shoot Baldur, the god of joy and gladness, with a mistletoe-tipped arrow. Baldur was killed and the Earth was plunged into darkness and mourning as a result.


Friday' was named after Frigg (or Frigga), the Norse goddess of marriage. Later she was confused with the goddess of love, Freya, who in turn became identified with Friday. When the Norsemen and Germanic tribes became Christians, Freya was supposed to have been banished to the mountains as a witch. Friday came to be called 'witches' Sabbath. It was believed that on this day, each week, twelve witches and the Devil met - thirteen evil spirits in all.


Science and Number 13

13 is a Fibonacci Number.

13 is the 6th prime number. 6 is sometimes considered an unlucky number due to its association with 666 (18=9=closure).

13 is the second Star Number.

There are 13 circles in Metatron's Cube.

13 is the atomic number of aluminum. In chemistry and physics, the atomic number (also known as the proton number) is the number of protons found in the nucleus of an atom. It is traditionally represented by the symbol Z. The atomic number uniquely identifies a chemical element. In an atom of neutral charge, atomic number is equal to the number of electrons. The atomic number is closely related to the mass number, which is the total number of protons and neutrons in the nucleus of an atom.

The lunisolar calendar generally has 12 months but every second or third year has 13. According to another interpretation, the number 13 is unlucky because it is the number of full moons in a contemporary year, but two full moons in a sin